Argonne National Laboratory

Press Releases

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Argonne will work with ThermoAura Inc., of Colonie, NY, to improve the performance of commercially manufactured thermoelectric materials, one of seven new partnerships announced through the Department of Energy’s Small Business Voucher program. Higher performing thermoelectrics could improve the efficiency of air conditioning systems. (Image by Shutterstock/Artur Bogacki)
Seven small businesses to collaborate with Argonne to solve technical challenges

Seven small businesses have been selected to collaborate with researchers at Argonne to address technical challenges as part of DOE’s Small Business Vouchers Program.

May 31, 2017
A representation of the structure of a protein from the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, which causes foodborne illness, with an inhibitor molecule bound. (Image by Lizbeth Hedstrom (Brandeis University)/University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Battling infectious diseases with 3-D protein structures

A team of scientists used the Advanced Photon Source to find the 3-D structures of more than 1,000 proteins to be used for drug and vaccine research.

April 25, 2017
The University of Chicago, the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory announced today a new partnership called The Microbiome Center that will combine the three institutions’ efforts to understand the identity and function of microbes across environments.
New Microbiome Center to combine UChicago, Marine Biological Laboratory and Argonne expertise

The University of Chicago, the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), and the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today a new partnership called The Microbiome Center that will combine the three institutions' efforts to understand the identity and function of microbes across environments.

May 13, 2016
Scientists determined the structures of several important tuberculosis enzymes, which could lead to new drugs for the disease. Above: An image of the mycobacterium IMPDH complex when it is attached to IMP and the inhibitor MAD1. Courtesy Youngchang Kim/Argonne National Laboratory. Click to view larger.
Study reveals structure of tuberculosis enzyme, could offer drug target

A team of scientists, including several from Argonne, have determined the structures of several important tuberculosis enzymes, which could lead to new drugs for the disease.

November 2, 2015
U.S. scientists — including microbiologists, physicists, chemists and physicians — announce the creation of the Unified Microbiome Initiative (UMI), an interdisciplinary group that will coordinate areas of microbial research and make funding recommendations to federal agencies, private foundations, and corporate partners.
Scientists call for unified initiative to advance microbiome research

Leading scientists have formed a unified initiative to support basic research, technological development, and commercial applications to better understand and harness the capabilities of Earth’s vast systems of microorganisms.

October 28, 2015
The <em>Corynebacterium diphtheria</em> MdbA enzyme’s thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase fold is shown as arrows and two flanking helices in the lower part of the image. Protein components of the enzyme’s active site are depicted as spheres. The electrostatic potentials across the surface of the molecule are shown as semitransparent features, with blue and red shading representing positive and negative potentials, respectively. (Click image to enlarge.)
Studies reveal a unified approach to combating several bacterial diseases

Researchers have discovered structural similarities among bacteria of various types that create the possibility of short-circuiting the infections they cause in similar ways.

October 20, 2015
Jack Gilbert, a microbial ecologist and group leader in Argonne National Laboratory's Biosciences division, has been named one of Popular Science's "Brilliant 10" for his environmental and biomedical-focused research as part of the magazine's 14th annual awards list. (Click image for larger view.)
Argonne microbial ecologist Jack Gilbert named one of Popular Science’s "Brilliant 10"

Jack Gilbert, a microbial ecologist and group leader in Argonne National Laboratory's Biosciences division, has been named one of Popular Science's "Brilliant 10" for his environmental and biomedical-focused research as part of the magazine's 14th annual awards list.

September 23, 2015
Probiotic formula reverses cow’s milk allergies by changing gut bacteria of infants

Infants who developed tolerance to cow’s milk allergy showed an increase in bacterial strains associated with good health.

September 22, 2015
A study including researchers from Argonne and the University of Chicago found evidence that gut microbes affect circadian rhythms and metabolism in mice. Image: Shutterstock.
Gut microbes affect circadian rhythms in mice, study says

A study including researchers from Argonne and the University of Chicago found evidence that gut microbes affect circadian rhythms and metabolism in mice.

August 3, 2015
The research team reconstructed the crystal structure of BAP, a protein involved in the process by which marine archaea release carbon, to determine how it functioned, as well as its larger role in carbon cycling in marine sediments. (Click image to view larger.)
Closer look at microorganism provides insight on carbon cycling

Researchers from Argonne and the University of Tennessee found that microorganisms called archaea living in marine sediments use completely novel enzymes to break down organic matter into carbon dioxide.

July 13, 2015